Seeking egg donor in Singapore

Is it easy to find egg donors in Singapore?

  • Yes

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  • No

    Votes: 3 100.0%

  • Total voters
    3

Rene1

New Member
Hi, my husband and I are an Indian couple based in Singapore.

We found each other later in life. We have been trying to have a child of our own past few years and it’s been a uphill battle. Our last ivf cycle too ended in disappointment. We have bee advised to consider egg donor.

We are in search of a kindhearted woman to bless us with donor eggs to help us bring an angel to this world. We are well educated and are able to provide adequate support to the willing donor to help us through this process.

Our only hope now is through the generosity and kindness of an egg donor. If you are 20-36 years of age, Indian ethnicity (or a close match in appearance), ideally based in Singapore, healthy, non smoker are interested in helping our dreams of having a family come true then please pm me or contact me at my number.

We are a serious and responsible couple and would like to start the process soonest possible.
 


Relevant Q & A on the Quora website:



Please also see the following previous threads:







 

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Rene1

New Member
Hi, my husband and I are an Indian couple based in Singapore.

We found each other later in life. We have been trying to have a child of our own past few years and it’s been a uphill battle. Our last ivf cycle too ended in disappointment. We have bee advised to consider egg donor.

We are in search of a kindhearted woman to bless us with donor eggs to help us bring an angel to this world. We are well educated and are able to provide adequate support to the willing donor to help us through this process.

Our only hope now is through the generosity and kindness of an egg donor. If you are 20-30 years of age, Indian ethnicity (or a close match in appearance), ideally based in Singapore, healthy, non smoker are interested in helping our dreams of having a family come true then please pm me or contact me at my number.

We are a serious and responsible couple and would like to start the process soonest possible.
 
Hi, I was advised that the Ministry of Health permit patients to import frozen eggs from a European egg bank ("Ovogenebank", formerly known as "First Egg Bank", see attached catalogue and price list). But not sure whether they would have an Indian donor.

However, I saw on several websites that the success rates for frozen donor eggs is significantly lower than fresh donor eggs (see attached bar chart). Therefore, I am hesitant whether or not to take this route.

Beware of the risks of using frozen donor eggs imported from an egg bank, says an American fertility specialist:


At another fertility clinic, a nurse hinted to me that I can secretly use a Malaysian or Thai egg donor agency to discreetly send an egg donor to Singapore. But payment must be kept secret. The donor and us must sign a form declaring that the donor is not paid and donating her eggs altruistically to us. The nurse also hinted to me that the doctor and fertility counselor may suspect or secretly know that we are using a foreign agency and paying the egg donor, but they will be willing to 'close one eye' and look the other way.

All legal liability will be on us, since we have signed the form declaring that the egg donation is unpaid and altruistic. The clinic and IVF lab will be free of any legal responsibility for the secret payment, once the appropriate forms have been signed. I am seriously considering taking up this route for egg donation, and am wondering whether fellow bloggers have had any experience taking this route. Please share your experience.
 

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Interesting article from Today Online:

Overseas egg donors — what Singaporean women should be wary of

Recent news media reports suggest that most Singaporean women requiring egg donation travel abroad for the procedure.

Strict regulations against payment of egg donors have resulted in a persistent shortage of donated eggs in Singapore. At the same time, women in Singapore do not have the option of freezing their own eggs when they are younger, due to the current ban on social egg freezing. This would leave many of them with no choice but to resort to overseas egg donation to conceive a child.

Foreign egg donors often receive generous payment abroad. Hence, there is a large pool of anonymous egg donors of suitable ethnicity to choose from abroad. Moreover, the medical fees of foreign fertility clinics may be much cheaper compared to Singapore.

In fact, some local fertility clinics have collaborative ties with foreign clinics that perform egg donation. Hence, they would be able to advise patients on egg donation overseas, as well as coordinate with foreign clinics in the timing of hormonal injections to prepare the patient’s womb to be receptive for the egg-donation procedure abroad.

However, due to the less stringent regulation of fertility treatment in other countries, Singaporean patients may face a variety of marketing gimmicks and misleading information on the egg-donation procedure. Hence, it is imperative to highlight what Singaporean patients should be wary of, when travelling abroad for egg donation.

Although some claims put forward by foreign fertility clinics appear to have a sound scientific basis, it is important for patients to understand the limitations of such claims. For example, consider the claim that the egg-donation procedure has a much higher success rate compared to standard in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment.

This is generally true to a large extent, simply because the selected egg donors are young and healthy. However, if the recipient patient had previous health problems with her womb that lead to recurrent miscarriages (e.g. endometriosis, uterine fibroids), then her chances of conceiving through egg donation might be much lower than advertised by the fertility clinic.

Other claims may have less scientific basis. For example, many foreign fertility clinics strongly encourage their patients undergoing egg donation to utilise preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) to detect genetic defects in the conceived embryos, due to the unknown genetic heritage of the anonymous foreign egg donor.

Yet they often neglect to tell patients that similar genetic screening of the donor’s blood sample is much cheaper than PGS. Patients must also be aware that PGS is not a fool-proof method to detect genetic abnormalities in embryos, despite its high costs.

There is a only a limited panel of common genetic diseases that PGS will detect, so it is impossible to screen and verify the entire genome of each individual embryo to be free of genetic defects.

One notable example that cannot be detected by PGS is Autism Spectrum Disorders that are caused by multiple genes interacting with multiple factors within the birth environment.

Additionally, if the egg donor is very young, it is unnecessary to utilise PGS to screen for Down syndrome that usually arises from genetic abnormalities in the eggs of older women.

Although many fertility clinics claim that PGS can improve the IVF success rates of older women, this only refers to older women using their own eggs, which have a high incidence of genetic abnormalities. PGS will not improve the success rates of older women using a young egg donor.


It must also be noted that PGS is not completely risk-free. There is a small chance of damaging the embryo as this delicate procedure involves drilling a hole through its protective shell (zona), to extract cells for genetic testing.

An important fact that is often downplayed by foreign fertility clinics is that the recipient patient’s age does really matter in egg donation. Recent much-hyped news reports about elderly women successfully giving birth in their 60s and 70s have led to many misconceptions.

It is well-established in the medical literature that the risks of medical complications during pregnancy increase with maternal age.

Another factor to consider is whether the expected remaining lifespans of the recipient couple are sufficient for raising a child to adulthood.

Older patients travelling abroad for egg donation should ask themselves whether as elderly parents, they would be able to cope with the physical rigours of child-rearing.

Yet another critical piece of information that is often downplayed by foreign fertility clinics is the risk of accidental incest between half-siblings conceived by the same egg donor.

Although such risks may be minimised in Singapore through safeguards that limit the number of children conceived per donor to three, it must be noted that there is no limit to the number of Singaporean recipients that a single foreign egg donor can donate to abroad.

The risks of accidental incest may be further compounded by the much reported phenomenon of ‘Genetic Sexual Attraction’, which is sexual attraction between close-relatives that first meet as adults, for example siblings that are separated at birth and adopted by different families.

This is particularly significant for Singaporean patients, given the small size and high population density of their country.

Patients should also take note of a deceptive marketing gimmick that claims a woman receiving egg donation passes some of her genetic material to the conceived child.

This misconception came about because of misleading news reports a few years ago, about the gene expression behaviour of embryos being influenced by the nurturing fluid produced by the womb lining. This is due to the embryo taking up a molecule known as microRNA, which is a chemical relative of DNA.

Being closely-related to DNA, microRNA can very broadly and loosely be considered a form of genetic material. However it is extremely short-lived and fragile, and does not transmit genetic inheritance from parent to child.

Some foreign fertility clinics may offer frozen egg donation as a cheaper alternative to fresh egg donation. The lower expenses are due to simpler logistics, as there is no need to synchronise the hormonal stimulation cycles of the donor and recipient patient, as well as cost savings from negating the travel and hotel stay required for fresh egg donation.

However, the significantly lower success rates of frozen versus fresh egg donation, are often downplayed.

Last, but not least, Singaporean patients should also be aware of the lack of appropriate counselling for egg donation overseas. Rigorous counselling will ensure that both husband and wife are agreeable to egg donation, without any misgivings or emotional blackmail from either spouse, and without undue pressure from parents and in-laws.

Additionally, they would also miss valuable advice on whether or not to tell their child the truth about his/her conception in the future.

Perhaps, to avoid the perils and hassles of overseas egg donation, the Ministry of Health in Singapore should look at various ways to boost the local supply of donated eggs.

One solution may be to permit adequate monetary compensation for egg donation, which is a tedious and painful procedure. Another solution may be to permit social egg freezing with certain conditions, such as age limits of 35, which would negate the need for egg donation.

At the same time, permitting social egg freezing will also likely lead to an accumulated surplus of unused frozen eggs that can potentially be donated to infertile women.
 
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Interesting videos which inform patients that PGS (Preimplantation Genetic Screening), also known as PGT-A (Preimplantation Genetic Testing - Aneuploidy) is absolutely unnecessary for egg donation cycles:



Singaporean patients undergoing egg donation should beware of Malaysian IVF clinics trying to hard-sell highly expensive embryo genetic testing (PGS / PGT-A) to them. Some of these hard-selling tactics include:

(i) Playing on their fears of unknown genetic defects being carried by the egg donor. Singaporean patient should note that there are much cheaper alternative methods of genetic screening such as testing of the egg donor's blood sample before starting IVF, or NIPT (Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing), which can be done after getting pregnant. A blood sample contains thousands of white blood cells, from which an abundant amount of DNA genetic material can be extracted. By contrast, only a few cells and tiny amount of DNA are extracted from the embryo during PGS (biopsy procedure). This makes it technically simpler and much cheaper to do genetic testing of the Egg Donor's blood sample, as compared to genetic screening of embryos with PGS / PGT-A.

(ii) Playing on their fears of Down syndrome. In reality, the chances of Down Syndrome with young donor eggs is extremely low. As seen in the attached tables and charts, the chances of Down Syndrome for a 20 year-old donor is 0.05% (1 in 2,000), while that for a 25 year-old donor is 0.083% (1 in 1,200). If patients are really worried about the possibility of Down syndrome, they can always do NIPT (Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing) after getting pregnant, which is very much cheaper than PGS (PGT-A).

(iii) Claiming that PGS (PGT-A) can improve the IVF success rates with donor eggs. This maybe true only for older women undergoing IVF with their own eggs, because of spontaneous genetic abnormalities that occur more frequently in the eggs of older women. Egg donors are typically very young, aged between 20 to 25 years of age, with very healthy eggs. Hence, PGS (PGT-A) will not further improve the already high IVF success rates of older women using donor eggs.

(iv) Playing on their biased preference for either a son or daughter. It is true that PGS (PGT-A) is the most effective method of sex-selection. But the question is whether it is moral and ethical for Malaysian IVF clinics to hard-sell such an expensive technique to Singaporean patients?

(v) Downplaying the risks of damaging the embryo during genetic testing with PGS (PGT-A). This is a highly delicate procedure that involves drilling a hole through the embryo shell (Zona Pellucidae), and extracting a few cells for genetic testing. No matter how well-trained is the lab staff (embryologist) doing the procedure, there is still a risk of human error. The more busy the IVF lab is, the greater the risk of human error, as lab staff are under pressure to complete procedures as fast as possible.
 

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Interesting Straits Times Article:

Egg donors: Payment ban can create a black and a grey market

We are facing a brave new world with the advent of scientific breakthroughs such as the "three-parent" technique where a baby is born using DNA from three people. This is just one of many examples of new reproductive technologies to come, which will likely result in an insatiable demand for donated eggs. If not managed carefully, this can potentially lead to exploitation and abuse of both patients and donors.

Currently in Singapore, health regulations explicitly forbid women who donate their eggs from receiving payment for their contributions; and there has to be a completely altruistic transaction between the donor and recipient. However, the recipient patient is allowed to pay for the cost of reasonable expenses incurred during this process, such as travelling costs.

Such stringent regulations, together with the ban on social egg freezing (where women freeze their eggs when young and fertile, and keep them for future pregnancy) and the increasing trend of late marriages and motherhood, will boost the overwhelming demand for scarce donor eggs. Already, increasing numbers of local patients are seeking such fertility treatment abroad, as reported in The Straits Times a few years ago.

Banning payment of egg donors will not stop commodification, nor will it lead to a more ethically and morally acceptable situation. Instead, the combination of scarce supply, high demand by desperate patients, cash-strapped female university students, Internet technology and increasing globalisation and outsourcing of medical services, will inevitably fuel a black and a grey market for donor eggs.

This is best exemplified by the current situation in other jurisdictions that have banned commercial transaction of donated eggs. In China, for example, there have been tabloid reports of under-the-table payment for egg donation being made to vulnerable schoolgirls and university students by desperate patients, either through illegal brokers or via Internet websites. Reportedly, the amount of payment depended on the academic qualifications and physical beauty of the prospective egg donor.

Similarly in Australia, where most prospective egg donors connect to patients via the Internet, there have been stories of bidding wars in under-the-table payments to the most desirable egg donors. It was reported that one grateful couple "gifted" some dental work to their egg donor.

In Singapore, patients are usually required to seek and find their own egg donor, who may be a relative, close friend or even complete stranger. The pertinent question is whether under-the-table payment to egg donors can be prevented by the current system of donor screening and counselling put in place by the Ministry of Health. Could there also be other undue inducements, such as expensive dining and luxury hotel stay for donors sourced from abroad?

ETHICAL ISSUES

There are also ethical issues surrounding the lack of donor anonymity and its consequent psychological impact on both parents and children, if patients were requested to source their own egg donors.

Recently, numerous egg- donation agencies have sprung up in neighbouring countries which have offered their services in sourcing Asian egg donors for immigrant couples based in Western countries.

The usual practice is for a "coordinator" to accompany the egg donor while travelling abroad and "coach" her on passing rigorous psychological evaluation tests for egg donation. It is possible that some may target Singapore-based couples.

Hence, it would be very difficult for doctors and fertility counsellors in Singapore to discern whether prospective egg donors have been sourced through such foreign agencies and offered illegal under-the-table payments. After all, it is not the job of fertility clinics here to police such illicit activities. Perhaps, it may be in their own interest to turn a blind eye, even if they were secretly aware of such goings-on.


COLLUSION BETWEEN DOCS AND FOREIGN EGG DONOR AGENCIES

There is also a possibility of surreptitious collusion between local fertility clinics and foreign egg donation agencies. For example, doctors or nurses may drop a hint to their patients to seek such agencies, if they fail to solicit egg donation from their own relatives and friends.

Besides an outright black market in the form of illegal brokers and under-the-table payment to egg donors, a grey market may also emerge through ethically questionable practices by fertility clinics and doctors.

For example, in many jurisdictions that ban commercial transaction of donated eggs, there are seldom any laws that prevent local doctors from referring or recommending their patients to receive egg donation at foreign fertility clinics, in which they have a financial interest.

Furthermore, many of these jurisdictions also lack regulations that prevent locally registered fertility doctors from travelling abroad to perform procedures related to commercialised egg donation.

Another dubious practice is to encourage patients to freeze all their unfertilised eggs instead of embryos, on the pretext of preventing destruction of human life upon embryo disposal, as well as to avoid legal entanglements associated with divorce or separation. The excess unused frozen eggs can then be altruistically donated to other infertile couples.

It is often the case that patients who had successfully completed fertility treatment feel a deep sense of gratitude to their doctor. Hence, fertility doctors can easily manipulate the doctor-patient fiduciary relationship based on trust and goodwill, to cajole their former patients to altruistically donate their unused excess frozen eggs.

But in fact, because unfertilised eggs always survive the freezing process less well than embryos, the cumulative success rates for patients are diminished. These doctors may even earn additional medical fees from the egg-donation procedure, even though no commercial transaction of donated eggs has actually taken place between donor and recipient.

Because fertility doctors soliciting altruistic egg donation from their own patients usually control the distribution and allocation of the donated eggs to other patients, this can potentially lead to other abuses.

For example, premium medical fees can be charged to unsuspecting patients receiving egg donation, which could in fact mask the sale of the donated eggs. There is no longer a level playing field, because the patient's choice of fertility clinic would now be influenced by the availability of donated eggs rather than the doctor's skill and expertise.

Moreover, fertility doctors controlling distribution of scarce donor eggs may become the target of bribery. For example, desperate patients can offer to sign up for more expensive medical packages that include antenatal and postnatal care besides fertility treatment, in return for priority in receiving altruistically donated eggs.

Hence the Ministry of Health in Singapore should seriously reconsider a system of financial compensation of egg donors with appropriate checks and balances, similar to that implemented for kidney donors.

Rather than pretending that commodification of donated eggs cannot take place with an outright ban on payment to egg donors, it may perhaps be wiser and more prudent to permit and regulate it under a strictly controlled environment.
 
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Rene1

New Member
Thanks. We researched the info as well. Our condition needs a angel donor. So we hope for someone willing to help us.
 

Botbot

New Member
We are also looking for any forum or reviews on Malaysia donor egg facilities. Any one did it with donor eggs overseas? Could you kindly share your experience with us?

We are a Chinese couple and have been TTC for a few years now. We are also open to doing donor eggs in Singapore. But sadly, do not know of anyone willing to donate their eggs
 
We are also looking for any forum or reviews on Malaysia donor egg facilities. Any one did it with donor eggs overseas? Could you kindly share your experience with us?

We are a Chinese couple and have been TTC for a few years now. We are also open to doing donor eggs in Singapore. But sadly, do not know of anyone willing to donate their eggs
Dear Botbot,

Please kindly click on this website link for more information. Hope this helps.

 
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Botbot

New Member
Hi, we are still looking for a Chinese young donor in Singapore who is willing to help us fulfill our dreams of having children. We are willing to compensate for costs incurred by her e.g. transport etc etc

We have been trying to conceive for 3 years now. Tried 3 rounds of IVF, 2 IUIs, had a miscarriage when baby was 8 weeks and multiple chemical pregnancies. Seen several doctors and believed the root cause is the quality of my egg. I'm 41 and my husband is 46.

We contacted first egg bank but their costs for Asian embryos are really high. Around $S20k for 6 oocytes. (Breakdown below for those who are interested)

6 oocytes - 9500 euro
8 oocytes - 12600 euro
12 oocytes - 19000 euro
Transport 3100 euro

They tie up with Mount Elizabeth and the cost there is another 10-15K. (This portion is more palatable as I'll have to incur this as part of the process regardless if I do IVF or donor eggs)

We are hoping to find someone in Singapore willing to reach out and help us.

Age: Below 27
Race: Chinese
Blood group: B+ or O
Nil family medical history that can be inherited thru genes e.g. Cancer.
 
Hi, we are still looking for a Chinese young donor in Singapore who is willing to help us fulfill our dreams of having children. We are willing to compensate for costs incurred by her e.g. transport etc etc

We have been trying to conceive for 3 years now. Tried 3 rounds of IVF, 2 IUIs, had a miscarriage when baby was 8 weeks and multiple chemical pregnancies. Seen several doctors and believed the root cause is the quality of my egg. I'm 41 and my husband is 46.

We contacted first egg bank but their costs for Asian embryos are really high. Around $S20k for 6 oocytes. (Breakdown below for those who are interested)

6 oocytes - 9500 euro
8 oocytes - 12600 euro
12 oocytes - 19000 euro
Transport 3100 euro

They tie up with Mount Elizabeth and the cost there is another 10-15K. (This portion is more palatable as I'll have to incur this as part of the process regardless if I do IVF or donor eggs)

We are hoping to find someone in Singapore willing to reach out and help us.

Age: Below 27
Race: Chinese
Blood group: B+ or O
Nil family medical history that can be inherited thru genes e.g. Cancer.
Dear Botbot,

This Egg Bank based in Europe in fact sourced their Chinese and Asian donors from another egg bank in Penang, Malaysia. (Some of the catalog photos and donor profiles are very similar, if not identical). The irony is that this particular egg bank in Malaysia has not been officially approved by MOH for import.

Here are the websites of the Malaysian Egg Bank:

https://fertilitymy.com/home/asian-egg-donors


In fact I inquired at the Malaysian Egg Bank, and they told me that it would not be possible for them to directly export frozen donor eggs to Singapore, as there is no MOH approval. So I need to go through "Ovogenebank", formerly known as "First Egg Bank".

This Malaysian egg bank is closely-affiliated with the Island Fertility Centre in Penang. An added advantage is that they also provide fresh donor eggs to patients of Island Fertility Centre.

You may consider going there after this pandemic is over.

 
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We are also looking for any forum or reviews on Malaysia donor egg facilities. Any one did it with donor eggs overseas? Could you kindly share your experience with us?

We are a Chinese couple and have been TTC for a few years now. We are also open to doing donor eggs in Singapore. But sadly, do not know of anyone willing to donate their eggs

For Egg Donation in Malaysia, do take the following precautions:

(1) Because it is unknown whether the anonymous egg donor is carrying any genetic defect, your doctor may strongly push you to do highly-expensive genetic screening of IVF embryos (PGS / PGT-A). This may not be neccessary, because there are much cheaper alternatives such as genetic testing of the egg donor's blood sample and NIPT (Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing). Please refer to the following threads:

(2) In the case of egg donation in Johor, beware that most egg donors come from out-of-town or out-of-state. It is much more difficult to ensure that traveling egg donors from out-of-town strictly follow the painful and tedious stimulation protocol of hormone injections, which is absolutely crucial for IVF success. Without strict adherence to the injection protocol, the number and quality of eggs obtained from the donor will be severely compromised. Please refer to the following thread:

(3) Some IVF clinics in Malaysia offer frozen egg donation. For best results, ensure that the fertility clinic that do IVF / ICSI with frozen donor egg is also same clinic that freeze the eggs. Also beware that IVF success rates with frozen (vitrified) donor eggs are significantly lower than that with fresh donor eggs. Please refer to the following thread:
 
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Zeeziee

New Member
Hi, we are still looking for a Chinese young donor in Singapore who is willing to help us fulfill our dreams of having children. We are willing to compensate for costs incurred by her e.g. transport etc etc

We have been trying to conceive for 3 years now. Tried 3 rounds of IVF, 2 IUIs, had a miscarriage when baby was 8 weeks and multiple chemical pregnancies. Seen several doctors and believed the root cause is the quality of my egg. I'm 41 and my husband is 46.

We contacted first egg bank but their costs for Asian embryos are really high. Around $S20k for 6 oocytes. (Breakdown below for those who are interested)

6 oocytes - 9500 euro
8 oocytes - 12600 euro
12 oocytes - 19000 euro
Transport 3100 euro

They tie up with Mount Elizabeth and the cost there is another 10-15K. (This portion is more palatable as I'll have to incur this as part of the process regardless if I do IVF or donor eggs)

We are hoping to find someone in Singapore willing to reach out and help us.

Age: Below 27
Race: Chinese
Blood group: B+ or O
Nil family medical history that can be inherited thru genes e.g. Cancer.
Hi Botbot,
Do you have the full cost breakdown for Mt E (cost of bringing frozen donor egg +ivf)? And is it for 6 oocytes + transport?
thanks!
 

Chingmee

Member
Hi Botbot,
Do you have the full cost breakdown for Mt E (cost of bringing frozen donor egg +ivf)? And is it for 6 oocytes + transport?
thanks!
For Asian donor eggs:

6 frozen donor eggs - 9500 euro

8 frozen donor eggs - 12600 euro
12 frozen donor eggs - 19000 euro
Transport - 3100 euro


By comparison, the price of Caucasian donor eggs from the same egg bank are as follows:

6 frozen donor eggs - 3400 euro

8 frozen donor eggs - 4500 euro
12 frozen donor eggs - 6500 euro

Transport - 3100 euro

This Egg Bank based in Europe in fact sourced their Chinese and Asian donors from another egg bank in Penang, Malaysia.
(Some of the catalog photos and donor profiles are very similar, if not identical). The irony is that this particular egg bank in Malaysia has not been officially approved by MOH for import.

This egg bank is run by Cathie Sanchez, a former nurse and yoga teacher from Australia, and goes under the name of:

www. fertilitymy .com or www. eggbankasia .com

Phone number: +60-12-579-2006
WeChat ID: EggBankAsia

In fact, upon inquiring at the Malaysian Egg Bank, they told me that it would not be possible for them to directly export frozen donor eggs to Singapore, as there is no MOH approval. So I need to go through Ovogenebank (formerly known as "First Egg Bank").

This Malaysian egg bank is closely-affiliated with the Island Fertility Centre in Penang. An added advantage is that they also provide fresh donor eggs to patients of Island Fertility Centre.

You may consider going there after this pandemic is over.
 
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Chingmee

Member
5 egg donation options for Singaporeans :

Option 1: Seek out your own relatives or close friends as egg donors

  • Advantages
  1. An obvious advantage of using a blood relative such as a sibling or cousin as an egg donor, is that you have a genetic link to the conceived child. Additionally, you would also be familiar with any hereditary genetic diseases that run in the family. Here are the various fractions of DNA that you would share with your child, with different types of blood relatives as egg donor: full sister - 25%(1/4), half-sister or niece - 12.5%(1/8), first cousin - 6.25%(1/16), second cousin - 3.125%(1/32). Note that if you were using your own eggs, you would share 50%(1/2) of DNA with your child.
  2. The advantage of using a close friend is that you know her character and what she looks like, traits that may possibly be inherited by the conceived child.
  • Disadvantages
  1. It may be challenging to find a “young enough” donor among your own circle of friends and relatives, preferably below 30 years old, as recommended by most fertility clinics. Using older egg donors will obviously decrease your chances of success.
  2. Egg donation from close relatives may possibly cause awkwardness and tension in future family relationships, particularly at family gatherings during major festivals such as Chinese New Year.
  3. There is a lack of egg donor anonymity, and increased chances of the secret of the child’s conception being leaked out, either deliberately or inadvertently by a third party.

Option 2: Import frozen donor eggs from an overseas egg bank
  • Advantages
  1. Donor anonymity is maintained.
  2. There is a wide choice of donors available in foreign egg banks based in Western countries, even Asian and Chinese ones. Increasing demand worldwide has led to egg banks in Western countries recruiting donors of such ethnicity.
  • Disadvantages
  1. Besides the high costs of the frozen eggs, the transportation cost from a foreign country to Singapore is also very expensive, as it requires a special cryogenic container.
  2. A special custom permit is required to avoid the imported samples being subjected to x-ray, which could be highly damaging to the frozen eggs. Extensive paperwork may be required which could further add to the already high costs.
  3. Despite technological advances such as vitrification, the success rate with frozen eggs is still significantly lower than fresh eggs.
  4. Asian/Chinese donors eggs may be more expensive to procure from egg banks based in Western countries, as compared to Caucasian ones, due to the scarcity of Asian/Chinese donors in Western countries

Option 3: Look for an egg donor through the internet who is paid secretly, or utilize a foreign agency to send an egg donor to Singapore (strictly not recommended)
  • Advantages
  1. Freelance egg donors that you find from internet websites may be much cheaper than using a foreign egg donor agency..
  2. On the other hand, utilizing a well-established foreign egg donor agency may be a ‘safer’ option. Most reputable foreign agencies will insist on having a coordinator to accompany the donor to Singapore, to ensure that the donor punctiliously self-administers hormonal injections to stimulate her ovaries, as well as to make sure she fulfills her part of the contract.
  • Disadvantages
  1. Secret under-the-table payments to either freelance egg donors or foreign egg donor agencies are illegal under Singapore law.
  2. After paying freelance egg donors, there is no guarantee that they will fulfill their part of the bargain, in which case you have no legal recourse for recovering your money. Because payment for egg donation is illegal in Singapore, you will only implicate yourself in an illegal transaction if you decide to sue the would-be freelance egg donor.
  3. It maybe difficult to ensure that the freelance egg donor faithfully follows the painful and tedious procedure of daily hormone injections to stimulate egg production within her ovaries.
  4. Utilizing a foreign egg donor agency to send an egg donor to Singapore will be much more expensive. Besides the agency fees, there are also extra traveling and accommodation costs.
  5. It may be difficult for illicit payment to either a freelance egg donor or foreign egg donor agency to leak out. But if it does leak out, you will definitely end up in big trouble. Several years ago, a Singaporean tycoon was jailed and fined for paying an Indonesian man to donate his kidney.
  6. Additionally, it must be noted that local Singaporean IVF clinics would require both the recipient couple and egg donor to sign a declaration form stating that the donation is altruistic. Hence the crime of perjury would be committed by signing a false declaration.

Option 4: Travel overseas for egg donation at a foreign fertility clinic
  • Advantages
  1. The medical fees of foreign fertility clinics are often much cheaper compared to Singapore.
  2. Foreign egg donors are permitted to receive generous financial compensation abroad. As a result, there is a wide choice of egg donors of different ethnicity, physical characteristics and educational attainment available.
  3. Some local clinics have collaborative ties with foreign clinics that carry out egg donation. Hence, they would be able to advise you on egg donation overseas, as well as co-ordinate with foreign clinics in synchronizing hormonal injections to prepare your womb to be receptive for the egg donation procedure overseas.
  4. Preimplantation Genetic Screening (PGS) of embryos, which is highly restricted in Singapore, is readily available overseas. This might be an important consideration for patients receiving donated eggs, since it is unknown whether the anonymous egg donor is carrying any genetic defects.
  5. The use of PGS for embryo sex selection may be permitted in foreign countries.
  • Disadvantages
  1. There is no government co-funding and you cannot utilize your Central Provident Fund (CPF) for fertility treatment abroad.
  2. There is also the hassle and costs of overseas travel and hotel stay, which may be minimized if you choose a fertility clinic in nearby Johor Bahru.
  3. Knowing that patients are fearful of unknown genetic defects carried by the anonymous egg donor, foreign fertility clinics often strongly advocate patients to do expensive PGS, instead of recommending cheaper alternatives such as genetic testing of the egg donor’s blood sample, and Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT). This is not in the patient’s best interest, and is likely an attempt by foreign fertility clinics to make extra money off Singaporean patients.

Option 5: Utilize leftover frozen eggs from a local fertility clinic
  • Advantages
  1. Spare leftover frozen eggs are donated altruistically by other IVF patients who have successfully conceived a child, as a gesture of goodwill and desire to help others.
  • Disadvantages
  1. These are generally very scarce, but can be obtained from three sources: (i) Single women facing premature menopause or undergoing medical treatment that will damage their fertility such as chemotherapy are allowed to freeze their eggs. (ii) A few married couples undergoing IVF choose to freeze their excess unfertilized eggs instead of embryos for religious or personal reasons, as they view frozen embryos as ‘living entities’ that should not be culled through disposal. (iii) Contingency egg freezing is sometimes performed when the husband is unable to produce a usable sperm sample on the day of egg extraction surgery, for example ejaculation failure due to stress.
  2. As expected, patients would use their best quality eggs for their own treatment, so the few frozen leftovers would be of questionable quality.
  3. Upon receiving altruistic donation of leftover spare frozen eggs by other patients, be wary of being overcharged high medical fees by the fertility clinic, which could in fact "mask" the sale of the altruistically-donated eggs to you.
  4. Take note that fertility doctors persuading former patients to altruistically donate leftover frozen eggs to you face a conflict of interest, because they will be earning additional medical fees by performing the egg donation procedure on you. Moreover, such fertility doctors may manipulate and abuse the doctor-patient fiduciary relationship during the donation consent process, by exploiting their former patient's gratitude to them for successful fertility treatment.
 

lostpapa

New Member
Hi, I was advised that the Ministry of Health permit patients to import frozen eggs from a European egg bank ("Ovogenebank", formerly known as "First Egg Bank", see attached catalogue and price list). But not sure whether they would have an Indian donor.

However, I saw on several websites that the success rates for frozen donor eggs is significantly lower than fresh donor eggs (see attached bar chart). Therefore, I am hesitant whether or not to take this route.

Beware of the risks of using frozen donor eggs imported from an egg bank, says an American fertility specialist:


At another fertility clinic, a nurse hinted to me that I can secretly use a Malaysian or Thai egg donor agency to discreetly send an egg donor to Singapore. But payment must be kept secret. The donor and us must sign a form declaring that the donor is not paid and donating her eggs altruistically to us. The nurse also hinted to me that the doctor and fertility counselor may suspect or secretly know that we are using a foreign agency and paying the egg donor, but they will be willing to 'close one eye' and look the other way.

All legal liability will be on us, since we have signed the form declaring that the egg donation is unpaid and altruistic. The clinic and IVF lab will be free of any legal responsibility for the secret payment, once the appropriate forms have been signed. I am seriously considering taking up this route for egg donation, and am wondering whether fellow bloggers have had any experience taking this route. Please share your experience.
HI WHERE DID YOU GET THIS INFORMATION FROM THAT MINISTRY OF HEALTH IN SINGAPORE permit patients to import frozen eggs from a European egg bank ("Ovogenebank", formerly known as "First Egg Bank"

WHERE DID U GET THIS INFO I CANNOT SEEM TO FIND IT AND MOH DOESNT SEEM TO KNOW ABOUT THIS ALSO ?

PLEASE SHOW ME SOME PROOF ! DO NO SPREAD FALSE INFO HERE FOR PARENTS WITH HOPS OF HAVING A CHILD

R U SPREADING FAKE NEWS ?? @ADMIN PLEASE VERIFY THIS !
 
HI WHERE DID YOU GET THIS INFORMATION FROM THAT MINISTRY OF HEALTH IN SINGAPORE permit patients to import frozen eggs from a European egg bank ("Ovogenebank", formerly known as "First Egg Bank"

WHERE DID U GET THIS INFO I CANNOT SEEM TO FIND IT AND MOH DOESNT SEEM TO KNOW ABOUT THIS ALSO ?

PLEASE SHOW ME SOME PROOF ! DO NO SPREAD FALSE INFO HERE FOR PARENTS WITH HOPS OF HAVING A CHILD

R U SPREADING FAKE NEWS ?? @ADMIN PLEASE VERIFY THIS !
Dear sir/madam,

Please see the Mt. Elizabeth IVF website:

Scroll down and click on the "Egg Donor Programme" Tab.

You will see the following information:


  • Mount Elizabeth Fertility Centre is working with one of the largest egg donor banks in Europe to import donor eggs.
    The egg donor selection process can be complicated. We understand that the safety and quality of the donated oocytes are major concerns for patients trying for a successful pregnancy.
    To ensure this, all egg donors undergo infectious disease and genetic testing screening. In addition, the screening processes are in compliance with the European Union Tissues and Cells Directive (which sets and regulates the standards of quality and safety for the donation, procurement, testing, processing, preservation, storage and distribution of human tissues and cells) as well as Human Fertilisation & Embryology Authority's (HFEA) regulations on egg donation.
    MEFC will facilitate and coordinate with the overseas egg bank to handle all the shipping logistics for you when you are ready to embark on our donor egg programme. Our team of IVF physicians, embryologists, psychologists and staff nurses are dedicated to supporting you in every way as you begin the journey to fulfilling your dreams of parenthood.
    To get started, please email [email protected] or call +65 6731 2693 / 2626 for an appointment where we can help to answer all your questions.
 
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HI WHERE DID YOU GET THIS INFORMATION FROM THAT MINISTRY OF HEALTH IN SINGAPORE permit patients to import frozen eggs from a European egg bank ("Ovogenebank", formerly known as "First Egg Bank"

WHERE DID U GET THIS INFO I CANNOT SEEM TO FIND IT AND MOH DOESNT SEEM TO KNOW ABOUT THIS ALSO ?

PLEASE SHOW ME SOME PROOF ! DO NO SPREAD FALSE INFO HERE FOR PARENTS WITH HOPS OF HAVING A CHILD

R U SPREADING FAKE NEWS ?? @ADMIN PLEASE VERIFY THIS !
Please also see this comment by another member within the forum:

Also, see the following Straits Times Forum letter which alludes to import of frozen donor eggs into Singapore. If this is blatantly untrue, why would Straits Times publish it?
 
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lostpapa

New Member
Dear sir/madam,

Please see the Mt. Elizabeth IVF website:

Scroll down and click on the "Egg Donor Programme" Tab.

You will see the following information:


  • Mount Elizabeth Fertility Centre is working with one of the largest egg donor banks in Europe to import donor eggs.
    The egg donor selection process can be complicated. We understand that the safety and quality of the donated oocytes are major concerns for patients trying for a successful pregnancy.
    To ensure this, all egg donors undergo infectious disease and genetic testing screening. In addition, the screening processes are in compliance with the European Union Tissues and Cells Directive (which sets and regulates the standards of quality and safety for the donation, procurement, testing, processing, preservation, storage and distribution of human tissues and cells) as well as Human Fertilisation & Embryology Authority's (HFEA) regulations on egg donation.
    MEFC will facilitate and coordinate with the overseas egg bank to handle all the shipping logistics for you when you are ready to embark on our donor egg programme. Our team of IVF physicians, embryologists, psychologists and staff nurses are dedicated to supporting you in every way as you begin the journey to fulfilling your dreams of parenthood.
    To get started, please email [email protected] or call +65 6731 2693 / 2626 for an appointment where we can help to answer all your questions.
MOUNT E HAS STOPPED THE PROGRAM- TO WORK ON PROTOCOLS.. IT MIGHT TAKE MANY MONTHS OR MAYBE THE PROGRAM MAY NOT BE BROUGHT BACK. THIS IS WHAT WAS TOLD TO ME WHEN I CALLED MOUNT E FERTILITY CENTRE.


VIRITUS FERTILITY - IS STILL IN NEGOTIATION WITH OVERSEAS EGG BANK.... THIS WAS WHAT WAS TOLD TO ME OVER PHONE CALL AS WELL...

SO BASICALLY -- THE EGG DONOR PROGRAM IS ALL ON HOLD BY ALL THE FACILITATORS

SIGH .. NO HOPE
 
MOUNT E HAS STOPPED THE PROGRAM- TO WORK ON PROTOCOLS.. IT MIGHT TAKE MANY MONTHS OR MAYBE THE PROGRAM MAY NOT BE BROUGHT BACK. THIS IS WHAT WAS TOLD TO ME WHEN I CALLED MOUNT E FERTILITY CENTRE.


VIRITUS FERTILITY - IS STILL IN NEGOTIATION WITH OVERSEAS EGG BANK.... THIS WAS WHAT WAS TOLD TO ME OVER PHONE CALL AS WELL...

SO BASICALLY -- THE EGG DONOR PROGRAM IS ALL ON HOLD BY ALL THE FACILITATORS

SIGH .. NO HOPE
Dear lostpapa,
I can empathize with you and share your frustrations.

I personally think that the best option for us Singaporean patients, is to wait out this pandemic, and travel abroad for egg donation.

The womb of a woman does not age as fast as her ovaries. All is needed is a healthy womb to receive the donated eggs, and there have been several reports of women in their fifties and sixties giving birth to healthy babies with egg donation.

Unlike conventional IVF with her own eggs, a woman can really afford to wait for egg donation.

After much intensive research, I think that the most efficient and economical means of egg donation is to directly contact an egg donor agency in either KL or Penang, and let them arrange the egg donation procedure in their affiliated IVF clinic in either KL or Penang.

Greater cost will be incurred if you choose to undergo egg donation in Johor.

Please see this previous thread:

Do however be careful not to be pushed to undertake highly expensive genetic testing of embryos in Malaysia - PGS / PGT-A :
 
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MOUNT E HAS STOPPED THE PROGRAM- TO WORK ON PROTOCOLS.. IT MIGHT TAKE MANY MONTHS OR MAYBE THE PROGRAM MAY NOT BE BROUGHT BACK. THIS IS WHAT WAS TOLD TO ME WHEN I CALLED MOUNT E FERTILITY CENTRE.

VIRITUS FERTILITY - IS STILL IN NEGOTIATION WITH OVERSEAS EGG BANK.... THIS WAS WHAT WAS TOLD TO ME OVER PHONE CALL AS WELL...

SO BASICALLY -- THE EGG DONOR PROGRAM IS ALL ON HOLD BY ALL THE FACILITATORS

SIGH .. NO HOPE
Good News for all Singaporean IVF patients requiring Egg Donation !!!

Singapore has permitted import of frozen donor eggs from Egg Bank Asia, based in Penang, Malaysia. This Egg Bank has a wide and excellent choice of Chinese race egg donors. Currently there are 3 clinics in Singapore, which have either imported frozen donor eggs for their IVF patients from Egg Bank Asia, or are in negotiations to do so. These are as follows: (i) Alpha IVF Singapore, (ii) Centre for Human Reproduction at NUH, and (iii) Mt. Elizabeth Fertility Centre.

Website:

Phone number: +60-12-579-2006

WeChat ID: EggBankAsia

Email: [email protected]

However, before importing donor eggs into Singapore, patients should note the following:

(1) Transportation of frozen donor eggs into Singapore is very expensive.
Due to COVID-19 pandemic situation, the only method of import is by air-travel, land transport through the Causeway is prohibited. Current quoted cost of import through courier service: USD$1,800. The current cost of frozen donor eggs are as follows:

Known Egg Donor - USD$1,300 per frozen egg (Minimum order of 8 frozen eggs)

Anonymous Egg Donor - USD$1,000 per frozen egg (Minimum order of 8 frozen eggs)

(2) It is much cheaper to do the egg donation process in Penang (Malaysia), rather than import frozen donor eggs into an IVF clinic in Singapore.
Egg Bank Asia is closely affiliated with Island Fertility Centre based in Georgetown Penang. They offer the following packages:

Entire IVF package with 8 frozen donor eggs, including medical fees - USD$ 11,500

Entire IVF package with fresh egg donation, including medical fees - USD$ 16,500

(More expensive because more than 8 eggs usually obtained from young healthy donor, typically 15 to 20 eggs per cycle)

(3) An older women can afford to wait for egg donation, unlike IVF with her own eggs. The womb (uterus) does not age as fast as her ovaries. Why not wait out the pandemic, to enjoy cheaper costs of IVF treatment at Island Fertility Centre in Penang (Malaysia), which is closely affiliated with Egg Bank Asia?

(4) For best results, it is better to do Egg Donor IVF at Island Fertility Centre in Penang (which is closely-affiliated with Egg Bank Asia), rather than importing frozen donor eggs into Singapore. Avoid using frozen donor eggs that are transferred from an egg bank. If possible, use the IVF lab that is affiliated with that egg bank. This is because the thawing protocol must be matching and compatible with the freezing (vitrification) protocol, and only the same IVF lab that performs both the freezing and thawing processes, can ensure this. Also beware that IVF success rates with frozen donor eggs are significantly lower than with fresh donor eggs (see attached bar chart below).

Please refer to the following video podcast by Dr. John Jain, an American fertility specialist:

 

Attachments

Egg Bank Asia says no need for embryo genetic testing (PGS or PGT-A), unless Husband has sperm problem:

All donors have been rigorously screened (blood samples) for genetic diseases:

"Our egg donors are Chinese with an average age of 23 to 28, the optimal age for achieving pregnancy and together we have over 200 donors. All of our donors are pre-screened using advanced genetic carrier screening, the most advanced in Asia as we follow the recommendations of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American College of Medical geneticists and Genomics. Our screening is designed to detect genetic mutations associated with a large number of hereditary disorders with greater than 99.9% accuracy and is performed at our partner lab in the USA."
 

Botbot

New Member
Hi all, thought I provide some progress to help those who are on the same journey on looking for egg donors.

Mount Elizabeth works with Ovogene Egg Bank. For Asian eggs, ovogene charges eur 1800 per oocyctes, in sets. Details below. .
Set of 6 oocytes – 9500 euro
Set of 8 oocytes – 12600 euro
Set of 12 oocytes – 19000 euro
Delivery to sin is Eur 3100

Alpha IVF centre at Royal medical novena #12-12 works with Egg Bank Asia. EBA charges usd 1300 for each Asian oocytes. Delivery to sin is usd 1800. There is a guaranteed program available if sperm's quality meets WHO guidelines. This gives assurances that their oocytes are good. Eg if less than 4 embroys are created and no pregnancy happens, they will replace with another 4 oocytes, delivery cost is subsidised in those cases.

For both options above, you have to first see the doctors to check if you are suitable for the donor program and to go thru counseling by counsellor and embryologist.

Both takes about 4-6 weeks to send the oocytes to Singapore. Been advised to take at least 10 oocytes to ensure the probability of 1 live birth (quote dr Kelly from mt E)

Above costs are just the oocytes cost. You will still need to add on the hospital and doctor fees accordingly. That usually adds up to est sgd 4-8k.

I've seen both options but decided to go with Alpha and EBA because I preferred one of the donor offered by EBA. (Also because they are cheaper). Hoping that all turns out well for me and hubby! We have been TTC since 2018, went thru 4 IVFs, 2 IUI, 1 miscarriage, countless chemical pregnancy. Hopefully 2021 will reward us with blessings!

If you need any more info, feel free to reach out to me. Good luck to everyone reading this!
 
Special thanks to Angelica for sharing the info on EBA. It was from your post that we learnt about them! :)
Dear Botbot, good luck to you and your husband. There is actually one more new development, which I like to share with all patients requiring egg donation.

To circumvent COVID travel restrictions, Singapore now allows patients to freeze and transport the husband's sperm to foreign fertility clinics or egg banks, where these can be used to fertilize fresh donor eggs to produce frozen embryos, which can then be imported into Singapore.

This has 3 major advantages over the import of frozen unfertilized donor eggs:


(i) Fresh eggs typically produce better quality embryos and higher IVF success rates than frozen eggs

(ii) As you all know, sperm and embryos, particularly Day 5 Blastocysts are much more hardy and survive the freezing process much better than unfertilized eggs. Therefore, it is always better to transport frozen embryos rather than frozen unfertilized eggs into Singapore.

(iii) Best results are obtained by using the IVF lab affiliated with the egg bank, which recruited the egg donor and froze her eggs. IVF patients should avoid using frozen donor eggs that are transferred to their clinic from an external egg bank. This is because the thawing protocol must be matching and compatible with the freezing (vitrification) protocol (somewhat analogous to a lock and key). Only the same IVF lab that performs both the freezing and thawing processes can ensure this, to attain best IVF success rates.


Hence, it may be advantageous to freeze and transport the husband's sperm overseas for fertilization of fresh donor eggs, and transport the embryos obtained, rather than unfertilized eggs into Singapore. Indeed, one patient in Singapore has already sought and obtained approval for such a collaborative procedure to be done between a Singaporean IVF clinic and a fertility clinic based in the USA (Santa Monica Fertility Center).

Therefore contact your local IVF clinic, ask them to confirm with the MOH (Ministry of Health) whether a similar arrangement can be done with Egg Bank Asia or Island Fertility Centre in Penang.

Of course, no genetic testing (PGS/PGT-A) can be done on the embryos, if these are to be imported into Singapore.

In any case, genetic testing (PGS/PGT-A) is completely unnecessary, because Egg Bank Asia has already carried out rigorous genetic testing of the Egg Donor's blood samples:


All donors have been rigorously screened (blood samples) for genetic diseases:

"Our egg donors are Chinese with an average age of 23 to 28, the optimal age for achieving pregnancy and together we have over 200 donors. All of our donors are pre-screened using advanced genetic carrier screening, the most advanced in Asia as we follow the recommendations of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American College of Medical geneticists and Genomics. Our screening is designed to detect genetic mutations associated with a large number of hereditary disorders with greater than 99.9% accuracy and is performed at our partner lab in the USA."



Expert opinion by American fertility specialists that highly-expensive PGS (PGT-A) is not necessary for egg donation:




Hence
 
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The advent of international 'mail-order' egg donation

Abstract

The rising demand and increasing scarcity of donor oocytes in developed countries have led to some fertility clinics sourcing oocyte donors from abroad, particularly from poorer countries, in what is referred to as 'transnational' or 'international' oocyte donation. In a further new 'twist' to this scheme, frozen sperm of the recipient's male partner is exported abroad through courier mail and is used to fertilise donor oocytes in a foreign clinic to produce embryos, which are then cryopreserved and imported back by mail for transfer to the woman. There are numerous ethical concerns with regards to such means of procuring donor oocytes. First, there is an issue of exploiting economically underprivileged women in poorer countries and disproportionate gains on the part of medical doctors and fertility clinics. Second, there is a question of abdication of responsibility for the donor's welfare on the part of the fertility doctor who takes charge of the recipient's treatment abroad if oocyte donors were to develop severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Third, the issue of responsibility and accountability becomes even more contentious if congenital defects were to appear in offsprings born from transnational oocyte donation or in the case of transmission of communicable diseases such as hepatitis B, syphilis and AIDS to the recipient. Last, cost savings from the lower prescription price of fertility drugs in economically less-developed countries may not be passed down to the oocyte recipient but instead be exploited to boost the already substantial profit margin of fertility clinics and doctors.
 

Attachments

The advent of international ‘mail‐order’ oocyte donation
N Mukhopadhaya I Manyonda


Sir,

We read with great interest the commentary1 on the disturbing developments in the commercialisation of procreation. Boon Heng has rightly highlighted the very pertinent ethical and legal issues related to ‘mail‐order’ oocyte donation. However, there are at least two other issues of significance that merit attention.

First, patients often express concerns about the possibility of ‘gamete mix‐up’ and measures in place to reduce the risk of such human errors. In the UK, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA)’s expanded sixth edition of the Code of Practice published in 2003 contains sections dedicated to giving guidance on witnessing clinical laboratory procedures,** 1991–1993, the Committee on Social and Ethical Issues; from 1991 to 1999, social and ethical issues were considered by the Authority as a whole and ad hoc working groups which reported on individual areas of work; in 1999, a standing Ethics Committee was established, which became the Ethics and Law Committee in 2003, and these measures can reduce the occurrence of such events. Unfortunately, most European countries do not have a regulatory body. ‘Mail‐order’ oocyte donation poses the real danger of ‘gamete mix‐up’, a topical issue in the UK, which has attracted extensive media attention in recent months. Such a mix‐up has occurred in the UK, despite the stringent regulations put in place by the HFEA.

Second, the option or possibility for children born following gamete donation to access information about their genetic parents, and therefore be able to trace them, has been recognised as a ‘human right’. This has led to the abolition of statutory guarantees of anonymity of donors as of April 2005 in the UK. In the absence of a dedicated register of donors and recipients in most other European countries, it would be near impossible for the offsprings to trace their genetic parents in years to come. There is therefore an urgent need for the creation and maintenance of enforceable centralised registers, such as that maintained by HFEA, to record licensed treatment services and details of the gamete donors.

Whatever one’s views on the matter, international ‘mail‐order’ oocyte donation is now a reality and is probably to expand. Where this is possible, such as in the European Union, the challenge is for governments to step in and develop enforceable regulations that may minimise the unacceptable exploitation of egg donors in developing countries and provide safety and legal redress where required to the recipients in the developed world.

Without these measures and the others proposed by Boon Heng, it will not be long before we witness the ‘amazonisation’ of gamete sale on amazon.co.uk or on Ebay.
 

Attachments

Special thanks to Angelica for sharing the info on EBA. It was from your post that we learnt about them! :)
The Malaysian company Ulink (Sdn Bhd) can now handle export of Husband's frozen sperm sample to any fertility clinic in Malaysia, together with subsequent import of frozen embryos into a local IVF clinic in Singapore.

Their charges are RM4,500 for one-way, or RM9,000 for to-and-fro transportation, including all administrative fees for custom paperwork, as well as custom duties.

Ulink (Sdn Bhd) company website: ulinkassist.com
Contact person: Ms. Charmaine Khoo
Email address: [email protected]
Tel: +6016 625 2923 +603 7866 0640
Address: 8 Jalan 55 1/9A, Petaling Jaya 47301, Selangor, Malaysia
 

Attachments

Special thanks to Angelica for sharing the info on EBA. It was from your post that we learnt about them! :)
Sunfert International Fertility Centre (KL, Malaysia), now accepts frozen sperm samples from Singapore for fertilization of donor eggs to produce embryos, which are then frozen down and transported back to Singapore. Please note that import of IVF embryos into Singapore is only permitted if these have not been genetically tested by PGS / PGT-A.

Sunfert @ Bangsar South
Sunfert International Fertility Centre Sdn. Bhd.
Unit 2-2, Level 2, Nexus, Bangsar South
7, Jalan Kerinchi, 59200 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

T +60 (3) 7622 8688
F +60 (3) 2242 3168
E [email protected]
W www.sunfert.com
S www.facebook.com/sunfert



Details of egg donor program at the Singapore side:

Sunfert International Fertility Centre is currently working with the following fertility specialists in Singapore, for the freezing and export of the Husband's sperm sample into Malaysia, and subsequent import of the produced frozen embryos into Singapore for transfer to patients.

• Dr. Suresh Nair - Seed of Life:

Dr. Christine Yap - Mt. Elizabeth Fertility Centre:

For the exact costs of freezing Husband's sperm sample and subsequent frozen embryo transfer, please contact the above doctors and their affiliated fertility centres.


Details and costs of egg donor program at the Malaysia side - Sunfert International Fertility Centre:

The IVF-Egg Donation Programme Package costs MYR 32,000 + MYR 16,000 (donor's reimbursement via CASH / BANKTRANSFER ONLY).

The egg donation program has many Chinese donors. These donors are selected based on good ovarian reserve (good AMH levels) therefore between 8 - 12 eggs are expected to be harvested. However, there is no guarantee that eggs will be recovered or that fertilization will occur, embryo development / transfer / pregnancy from any fertility treatment.

The egg donation package includes the following:


  • Donor's clinical & blood investigations related to infectious disease screening.
  • Medication for the donor & recipient (up to pregnancy test).
  • Doctor's professional fee & Laboratory charges (IVF/ICSI)
  • Blastocyst culture, Laser Assisted Hatching (if necessary) & Time-Lapse Imaging up to 12 eggs by using one of the best platforms called the EmbryoScope®)
  • Cryofreezing of excess embryos & cryopreservation maintenance charges for the first 6 months
  • Psychological Assessment & Counselling (PAC) session (compulsory 1.5 hour session for all recipient)
  • 1st Frozen Embryo Transfer (FET)

However, the egg donation package price does not include the following:
  • Initial consultation and scan with our specialist, initial blood screening & semen analysis
  • Embryo cryopreservation maintenance charges (MYR 1200 / year)
  • Other adjunct treatment/services such as sperm separation, Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis/Screening (PGD/PGS), IMSI & Colorado Protocol
  • Further medications once pregnancy is confirmed by blood test

Costs of export and import of frozen sperm and embryos respectively, by Ulink Sdn Bhd:

The Malaysian company Ulink (Sdn Bhd) can now handle export of Husband's frozen sperm sample to any fertility clinic in Malaysia, together with subsequent import of frozen embryos into a local IVF clinic in Singapore.

Their charges are RM4,500 for one-way, or RM9,000 for to-and-fro transportation, including all administrative fees for custom paperwork, as well as custom duties.

Ulink (Sdn Bhd) company website: ulinkassist.com
Contact person: Ms. Charmaine Khoo
Email address: [email protected]
Tel: +6016 625 2923 +603 7866 0640
Address: 8 Jalan 55 1/9A, Petaling Jaya 47301, Selangor, Malaysia
 
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