Egg Donation in Singapore - Good News !!! Singapore allows import of frozen donor eggs from Egg Bank in Penang Malaysia

Good News for all Singaporean IVF patients requiring Egg Donation !!!

Singapore has permitted import of frozen donor eggs from Egg Bank Asia, based in Penang, Malaysia. This Egg Bank has a wide and excellent choice of Chinese race egg donors. Currently there are 3 clinics in Singapore, which have either imported frozen donor eggs for their IVF patients from Egg Bank Asia, or are in negotiations to do so. These are as follows: (i) Alpha IVF Singapore, (ii) Centre for Human Reproduction at NUH, and (iii) Mt. Elizabeth Fertility Centre.

Website:

Phone number: +60-12-579-2006

WeChat ID: EggBankAsia

Email: [email protected]

However, before importing donor eggs into Singapore, patients should note the following:


(1) Transportation of frozen donor eggs into Singapore is very expensive. Due to COVID-19 pandemic situation, the only method of import is by air-travel, land transport through the Causeway is prohibited. Current quoted cost of import through courier service: USD$1,800. The current cost of frozen donor eggs are as follows:

Known Egg Donor - USD$1,300 per frozen egg (Minimum order of 8 frozen eggs)

Anonymous Egg Donor - USD$1,000 per frozen egg (Minimum order of 8 frozen eggs)

(2) It is much cheaper to do the egg donation process in Penang (Malaysia), rather than import frozen donor eggs into an IVF clinic in Singapore.
Egg Bank Asia is closely affiliated with Island Fertility Centre based in Georgetown Penang. They offer the following packages:

Entire IVF package with 8 frozen donor eggs, including medical fees - USD$ 11,500

Entire IVF package with fresh egg donation, including medical fees - USD$ 16,500

(More expensive because more than 8 eggs usually obtained from young healthy donor, typically 15 to 20 eggs per cycle)

(3) An older women can afford to wait for egg donation, unlike IVF with her own eggs. The womb (uterus) does not age as fast as her ovaries. Why not wait out the pandemic, to enjoy cheaper costs of IVF treatment at Island Fertility Centre in Penang (Malaysia), which is closely affiliated with Egg Bank Asia?

(4) For best results, it is better to do Egg Donor IVF at Island Fertility Centre in Penang (which is closely-affiliated with Egg Bank Asia), rather than importing frozen donor eggs into Singapore. Avoid using frozen donor eggs that are transferred from an egg bank. If possible, use the IVF lab that is affiliated with that egg bank. This is because the thawing protocol must be matching and compatible with the freezing (vitrification) protocol, and only the same IVF lab that performs both the freezing and thawing processes, can ensure this. Also beware that IVF success rates with frozen donor eggs are significantly lower than with fresh donor eggs (see attached bar chart below).

Please refer to the following video podcast by Dr. John Jain, an American fertility specialist:



Previous relevant threads requesting more information on Egg Donation in Singapore:


MOUNT E HAS STOPPED THE PROGRAM- TO WORK ON PROTOCOLS.. IT MIGHT TAKE MANY MONTHS OR MAYBE THE PROGRAM MAY NOT BE BROUGHT BACK. THIS IS WHAT WAS TOLD TO ME WHEN I CALLED MOUNT E FERTILITY CENTRE.

VIRITUS FERTILITY - IS STILL IN NEGOTIATION WITH OVERSEAS EGG BANK.... THIS WAS WHAT WAS TOLD TO ME OVER PHONE CALL AS WELL...

SO BASICALLY -- THE EGG DONOR PROGRAM IS ALL ON HOLD BY ALL THE FACILITATORS

SIGH .. NO HOPE

Thanks. This infos is very much appreciated.

hello , has anyone here successfully conceived an angel w the help of an egg donor? could u please enlighten us abt the process and how did u find ur donor ? if u did, how much did you pay her for her services ? tq and best of luck
Hello all,

My wife and myself are looking for a chinese egg donor as we seek to have our own child.
We hope to find someone who can help us. Please do contact me if you can!

Hi ! I looking for egg donor so that when I do IVF got more high percentage . Did you manage to get the local agent contact no’s got Malaysian donor who are working in SG? Tks!

Would you know of a reputable egg donor agency which you would recommend?

We are also looking for any forum or reviews on Malaysia donor egg facilities. Any one did it with donor eggs overseas? Could you kindly share your experience with us? We are a Chinese couple and have been TTC for a few years now. We are also open to doing donor eggs in Singapore. But sadly, do not know of anyone willing to donate their eggs
Thanks. We researched the info as well. Our condition needs a angel donor. So we hope for someone willing to help us.
Hi Botbot,

Do you have the full cost breakdown for Mt E (cost of bringing frozen donor egg +ivf)? And is it for 6 oocytes + transport?

thanks!
thanks a lot angelica :)
Hi everyone,

I'm looking for an egg donor fresh or frozen, to try IVF.

Recently we found out that my eggs are no longer active and my body is already going thru menopausal stages.

The only way for me to be pregnant is thru IVF with donor eggs.

If anyone have balance eggs before the fertilization, i would welcome the donation.

Thank You.

Hope everyone is well and healthy during these dreadful times.

warm regards,

Hayari
Hi, is there anyone with successful IVF pregnancy at 43 to share?
 

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Egg Bank Asia says no need for embryo genetic testing (PGS or PGT-A), unless Husband has sperm problem:

All donors have been rigorously screened (blood samples) for genetic diseases:

"Our egg donors are Chinese with an average age of 23 to 28, the optimal age for achieving pregnancy and together we have over 200 donors. All of our donors are pre-screened using advanced genetic carrier screening, the most advanced in Asia as we follow the recommendations of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American College of Medical geneticists and Genomics. Our screening is designed to detect genetic mutations associated with a large number of hereditary disorders with greater than 99.9% accuracy and is performed at our partner lab in the USA."



 
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Hi! So now we can get EggBank Asia to import frozen egg to Singapore which we really need donor Egg so that we can have high chance of success rate when doing IVF?
 
Hi! So now we can get EggBank Asia to import frozen egg to Singapore which we really need donor Egg so that we can have high chance of success rate when doing IVF?
Dear Aries 12345,

Wondering whether you think it is worthwhile importing frozen donor eggs?

For me personally, rather than going through hassle and costs of importing frozen donor eggs, I rather wait out the Pandemic travel restrictions and travel to Malaysia directly for fresh egg donation.

According to the video podcast by Dr. John Jain, we should avoid using frozen donor eggs that are transferred from an egg bank. If possible, use the IVF lab that is affiliated with that egg bank. This is because the thawing protocol must be matching and compatible with the freezing (vitrification) protocol, and only the same IVF lab that performs both the freezing and thawing processes, can ensure this. Also we must note that IVF success rates with frozen donor eggs are significantly lower than with fresh donor eggs (see attached bar chart below).

 

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To circumvent COVID travel restrictions, Singapore now allows patients to freeze and transport the husband's sperm to foreign fertility clinics or egg banks, where these can be used to fertilize fresh donor eggs to produce frozen embryos, which can then be imported into Singapore.

This has 3 major advantages over the import of frozen unfertilized donor eggs:

(i) Fresh donor eggs typically produce better quality embryos and higher IVF success rates than frozen donor eggs.

(ii) As you all know, sperm and embryos, particularly Day 5 Blastocysts are much more hardy and survive the freezing process much better than unfertilized eggs. Therefore, it is always better to transport frozen embryos rather than frozen unfertilized eggs into Singapore.


(iii) Best results are obtained by using the IVF lab affiliated with the egg bank, which recruited the egg donor and froze her eggs. IVF patients should avoid using frozen donor eggs that are transferred to their clinic from an external egg bank. This is because the thawing protocol must be matching and compatible with the freezing (vitrification) protocol (somewhat analogous to a lock and key). Only the same IVF lab that performs both the freezing and thawing processes can ensure this, to attain best IVF success rates.


Hence, it may be advantageous to freeze and transport the husband's sperm overseas for fertilization of fresh donor eggs, and transport the embryos obtained, rather than unfertilized eggs into Singapore. Indeed, one patient in Singapore has already sought and obtained approval for such a collaborative procedure to be done between a Singaporean IVF clinic and a fertility clinic based in the USA (Santa Monica Fertility Center).

Therefore contact your local IVF clinic, ask them to confirm with the MOH (Ministry of Health) whether a similar arrangement can be done with Egg Bank Asia or Island Fertility Centre in Penang.

Of course, no genetic testing (PGS/PGT-A) can be done on the embryos, if these are to be imported into Singapore.

In any case, genetic testing (PGS/PGT-A) is completely unnecessary, because Egg Bank Asia has already carried out rigorous genetic testing of the Egg Donor's blood samples:

All donors have been rigorously screened (blood samples) for genetic diseases:


"Our egg donors are Chinese with an average age of 23 to 28, the optimal age for achieving pregnancy and together we have over 200 donors. All of our donors are pre-screened using advanced genetic carrier screening, the most advanced in Asia as we follow the recommendations of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American College of Medical geneticists and Genomics. Our screening is designed to detect genetic mutations associated with a large number of hereditary disorders with greater than 99.9% accuracy and is performed at our partner lab in the USA."


Expert opinion by American fertility specialists that highly-expensive PGS (PGT-A) is not necessary for egg donation:



 
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The Malaysian company Ulink (Sdn Bhd) can now handle export of Husband's frozen sperm sample to any fertility clinic in Malaysia, together with subsequent import of frozen embryos into a local IVF clinic in Singapore.

Their charges are RM4,500 for one-way, or RM9,000 for to-and-fro transportation, including all administrative fees for custom paperwork, as well as custom duties.

Ulink (Sdn Bhd) company website: ulinkassist.com
Contact person: Ms. Charmaine Khoo
Email address: [email protected]
Tel: +6016 625 2923 +603 7866 0640
Address: 8 Jalan 55 1/9A, Petaling Jaya 47301, Selangor, Malaysia
 

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The advent of international 'mail-order' egg donation

Abstract

The rising demand and increasing scarcity of donor oocytes in developed countries have led to some fertility clinics sourcing oocyte donors from abroad, particularly from poorer countries, in what is referred to as 'transnational' or 'international' oocyte donation. In a further new 'twist' to this scheme, frozen sperm of the recipient's male partner is exported abroad through courier mail and is used to fertilise donor oocytes in a foreign clinic to produce embryos, which are then cryopreserved and imported back by mail for transfer to the woman. There are numerous ethical concerns with regards to such means of procuring donor oocytes. First, there is an issue of exploiting economically underprivileged women in poorer countries and disproportionate gains on the part of medical doctors and fertility clinics. Second, there is a question of abdication of responsibility for the donor's welfare on the part of the fertility doctor who takes charge of the recipient's treatment abroad if oocyte donors were to develop severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Third, the issue of responsibility and accountability becomes even more contentious if congenital defects were to appear in offsprings born from transnational oocyte donation or in the case of transmission of communicable diseases such as hepatitis B, syphilis and AIDS to the recipient. Last, cost savings from the lower prescription price of fertility drugs in economically less-developed countries may not be passed down to the oocyte recipient but instead be exploited to boost the already substantial profit margin of fertility clinics and doctors.
 

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The advent of international ‘mail‐order’ oocyte donation
N Mukhopadhaya I Manyonda


Sir,

We read with great interest the commentary1 on the disturbing developments in the commercialisation of procreation. Boon Heng has rightly highlighted the very pertinent ethical and legal issues related to ‘mail‐order’ oocyte donation. However, there are at least two other issues of significance that merit attention.

First, patients often express concerns about the possibility of ‘gamete mix‐up’ and measures in place to reduce the risk of such human errors. In the UK, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA)’s expanded sixth edition of the Code of Practice published in 2003 contains sections dedicated to giving guidance on witnessing clinical laboratory procedures,** 1991–1993, the Committee on Social and Ethical Issues; from 1991 to 1999, social and ethical issues were considered by the Authority as a whole and ad hoc working groups which reported on individual areas of work; in 1999, a standing Ethics Committee was established, which became the Ethics and Law Committee in 2003, and these measures can reduce the occurrence of such events. Unfortunately, most European countries do not have a regulatory body. ‘Mail‐order’ oocyte donation poses the real danger of ‘gamete mix‐up’, a topical issue in the UK, which has attracted extensive media attention in recent months. Such a mix‐up has occurred in the UK, despite the stringent regulations put in place by the HFEA.

Second, the option or possibility for children born following gamete donation to access information about their genetic parents, and therefore be able to trace them, has been recognised as a ‘human right’. This has led to the abolition of statutory guarantees of anonymity of donors as of April 2005 in the UK. In the absence of a dedicated register of donors and recipients in most other European countries, it would be near impossible for the offsprings to trace their genetic parents in years to come. There is therefore an urgent need for the creation and maintenance of enforceable centralised registers, such as that maintained by HFEA, to record licensed treatment services and details of the gamete donors.

Whatever one’s views on the matter, international ‘mail‐order’ oocyte donation is now a reality and is probably to expand. Where this is possible, such as in the European Union, the challenge is for governments to step in and develop enforceable regulations that may minimise the unacceptable exploitation of egg donors in developing countries and provide safety and legal redress where required to the recipients in the developed world.

Without these measures and the others proposed by Boon Heng, it will not be long before we witness the ‘amazonisation’ of gamete sale on amazon.co.uk or on Ebay.
 

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Sunfert International Fertility Centre (KL, Malaysia), now accepts frozen sperm samples from Singapore for fertilization of donor eggs to produce embryos, which are then frozen down and transported back to Singapore. Please note that import of IVF embryos into Singapore is only permitted if these have not been genetically tested by PGS / PGT-A.

Sunfert @ Bangsar South
Sunfert International Fertility Centre Sdn. Bhd.
Unit 2-2, Level 2, Nexus, Bangsar South
7, Jalan Kerinchi, 59200 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

T +60 (3) 7622 8688
F +60 (3) 2242 3168
E [email protected]
W www.sunfert.com
S www.facebook.com/sunfert



Details of egg donor program at the Singapore side:

Sunfert International Fertility Centre is currently working with the following fertility specialists in Singapore, for the freezing and export of the Husband's sperm sample into Malaysia, and subsequent import of the produced frozen embryos into Singapore for transfer to patients.

• Dr. Suresh Nair - Seed of Life:

Dr. Christine Yap - Mt. Elizabeth Fertility Centre:

For the exact costs of freezing Husband's sperm sample and subsequent frozen embryo transfer, please contact the above doctors and their affiliated fertility centres.


Details and costs of egg donor program at the Malaysia side -Sunfert International Fertility Centre:

The IVF-Egg Donation Programme Package costs MYR 32,000 + MYR 16,000 (donor's reimbursement via CASH / BANKTRANSFER ONLY).

The egg donation program has many Chinese donors. These donors are selected based on good ovarian reserve (good AMH levels) therefore between 8 - 12 eggs are expected to be harvested. However, there is no guarantee that eggs will be recovered or that fertilization will occur, embryo development / transfer / pregnancy from any fertility treatment.

The egg donation package includes the following:


  • Donor's clinical & blood investigations related to infectious disease screening.
  • Medication for the donor & recipient (up to pregnancy test).
  • Doctor's professional fee & Laboratory charges (IVF/ICSI)
  • Blastocyst culture, Laser Assisted Hatching (if necessary) & Time-Lapse Imaging up to 12 eggs by using one of the best platforms called the EmbryoScope®)
  • Cryofreezing of excess embryos & cryopreservation maintenance charges for the first 6 months
  • Psychological Assessment & Counselling (PAC) session (compulsory 1.5 hour session for all recipient)
  • 1st Frozen Embryo Transfer (FET)

However, the egg donation package price does not include the following:
  • Initial consultation and scan with our specialist, initial blood screening & semen analysis
  • Embryo cryopreservation maintenance charges (MYR 1200 / year)
  • Other adjunct treatment/services such as sperm separation, Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis/Screening (PGD/PGS), IMSI & Colorado Protocol
  • Further medications once pregnancy is confirmed by blood test

Costs of export and import of frozen sperm and embryos respectively, by Ulink Sdn Bhd:

The Malaysian company Ulink (Sdn Bhd) can now handle export of Husband's frozen sperm sample to any fertility clinic in Malaysia, together with subsequent import of frozen embryos into a local IVF clinic in Singapore.

Their charges are RM4,500 for one-way, or RM9,000 for to-and-fro transportation, including all administrative fees for custom paperwork, as well as custom duties.

Ulink (Sdn Bhd) company website: ulinkassist.com
Contact person: Ms. Charmaine Khoo
Email address: [email protected]
Tel: +6016 625 2923 +603 7866 0640
Address: 8 Jalan 55 1/9A, Petaling Jaya 47301, Selangor, Malaysia
 
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Alternatively, Thomson Fertility Centre in Singapore, also collaborate with Heart2ART egg donor agency in Malaysia, for export of Husband's frozen sperm sample into Malaysia for in vitro fertilization of donor eggs to produce embryos, which are then frozen down and imported back into Singapore for transfer to the wife.

Information on procedures and costs at the Heart2ART agency side:

Altogether, the entire package cost of donor eggs, including IVF, embryo culture and freezing is RM 50,000.


Heart2ART egg donor agency
Website address:es

Email address: [email protected]
Address:
6-1, Jalan Setia Dagang AK U13,
Setia Alam, Seksyen U13,
40170 Shah Alam
Selangor, Malaysia.
TEL: +603-3362 3729
FAX: +603-3362 5729
Mobile: +6012 389 3840 (Christine)



Information on procedures and costs at the Thomson Fertility Centre Side:

Collection and freezing of Husband's sperm sample: SGD$175 (before GST)

Frozen Embryo Transfer procedure: SGD$3,500 to SGD$4,500 (before GST).
Variability is due to medications and consumables used by individual patients,
as well as whether there is need for Assisted Hatching procedure.


Costs of export and import of frozen sperm and embryos respectively, by Ulink Sdn Bhd:

The Malaysian company Ulink (Sdn Bhd) can now handle export of Husband's frozen sperm sample to any fertility clinic in Malaysia, together with subsequent import of frozen embryos into a local IVF clinic in Singapore.

Their charges are RM4,500 for one-way, or RM9,000 for to-and-fro transportation, including all administrative fees for custom paperwork, as well as custom duties.


Ulink (Sdn Bhd) company website: ulinkassist.com
Contact person: Ms. Charmaine Khoo
Email address: [email protected]
Tel: +6016 625 2923 +603 7866 0640
Address: 8 Jalan 55 1/9A, Petaling Jaya 47301, Selangor, Malaysia
 

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